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in a state, the federal government can't recognize those marriages. that's where you talked about federal benefits heterosexual couples get and same sex couples do not. the prop 8 thing is bigger. while potentially it's confined to the state of california only, the question it out there having given the right to gay marriage could the state then take it away through proposition 8 passed by a majority of the vote nurse 2008. having taken that case, the court could get to the bedrock issue. can any state refuse to let same sex couples get married under the federal constitution. it could potentially be narrow or very far. >> pete, as i understand it, let me ask you. this one of these things, maybe the driving one, is defense of marriage act was about paying the estate act. where one of the two people said she didn't have to pay the estate tax because a married couple wouldn't have to. >> reporter: this is a case from new york. a woman named edie windsor who married her partner in canada. the partner died and left edie the estate. the federal government said we can't recognize you as married.
government should stick to the constitution. the state courts have nothing to say about it. we say no gay marriage, period. we should not go around and heard them. it is unnatural for a man to be with a man. i think we should have won solid law against it. host: why keep it at a government level and not at the state level? caller: look at what is going on now. we set a lot. everybody says, i interpret it this way or that way. it is causing more and more problems. we do that all of the time. man, woman, period. host: "the washington post" adds -- good morning from minnesota on the democrats' line. caller: thank you for c-span. this is what i have not heard said by both -- most of the things i have listened to or watched between the debates on gay marriage. it is all legal documents. some states have the take a blood test. you have to get a marriage license from your state or county. when you get married, you get married in a church. % a church document with witnesses. if you get a divorce, you cannot say i will wrap up this thing we signed a in church. you have to get attorneys and illegal
to continue to reduce demand. >> what role should the government play in the future -- your business is in transportation, too -- we are mired in conversations about the fiscal cliff. we are talking about long-term infrastructure, a long term energy plan. >> this is the perfect opportunity for the government to work together to achieve a common goal. there is plenty of times when our interest might not call last with the interest of either of the parties. this is the opportunity we have never had before. you could have consumer, business, and the government's all working together to take advantage of this huge resource. for us, it makes so much sense because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 a quilt when natural gas. from the government point of view, everybody is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. everyone talks about taxes and what is going to happen with the fiscal cliff. there has been $1500 gone to increase oil prices. you can get them that tax cut today if you invested in our report. everybody talks about entitlements. high oil prices make the social security tr
, for exactly the reasons you just mentioned, because the government, you know, from the top down refuses to acknowledge this as terrorism, refuses to acknowledge the radical islamist angle, that he was communicating with a spiritual leader of al-qaeda before this attack happened, and because they still want to call it a workplace violence incident, they're unwilling to take all the necessary steps they would need to acknowledge that this guy's a traitor, killed our fellow members, and we're going the use every step possible. instead he's just a regular defendant on a murder trial, no islamic angle, and they're limited. megyn: well, you could make the argument that this will preserve the credibility of the verdict if it comes down guilty at the end of all these proceedings, that we bent over backward to protect this guy's rights as we do in our criminal justice system. pete, great to have you here. thanks so much for your perspective. >>> up next, a bombshell in the legal battle between the lawmakers in one state and their teachers' union. >>> plus, the woman best known for running "vogue
this to a c.e.o. in the crowd. so maybe david, you could take this. what role should the government play in the future of -- your business is transportation, too -- in the transportation business with this? look, we are mired in conversations about a fiscal cliff on the very right now. we're talking about long-term infrastructure build-out, a long-term energy plan. what role should c.e.o.'s have and the federal government have in making sure this gets done? >> this is the perfect opportunity for the federal government and for state governments to work together to achieve a common goal, right? there's plenty of times where, when we run a business, our interests might not coalesce with the interests of either of the parties. as fred said, this is the opportunity that we have never had in this country before, where you can have consumer, the business and the governments all working together to take advantage of this huge resource, if you want to call it saudi america. from a waste management perspective, for us it makes so much sense, because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 equi
government in the nation of mali, our ally. this may seem inconsequential to the average american, but it could have big implications for our security as well as that of our regional and global allies. because in the power vacuum that was created in that spring coup, al qaeda saw an opportunity and they stepped in. three different extremist groups all linked to or controlled by al qaeda in the islamic magra known as aqim now control an area the size of texas in the northern part of mali. they succeeded in fracturing a formerly stable democracy and contributing to broad security, political and humanitarian crises that i believe have grave implications for the region and for america's interests. to put it simply, mr. president, this matters. mali, a relatively strong democracy for more than two decades, is now embroiled in turmoil. the united states in partnership with the international community must show leadership in helping it rebuild its democracy and restore its territorial integrity by reclaiming it from terrorists. so thi this morninges as the chr of the african chair subcom
, a bloomberg government former members of both parties said negotiators should be able to reach an agreement. in an hour, president obama speaks to ceo's at the business roundtable, followed by news conferences with house speaker john boehner and minority leader nancy pelosi. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of six-three, i believe, and they will say that is precedent. indiana had a voter i.d. -- >> they decided on the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish id they did not say all of that was subsequently -- >> they talked about indiana. you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people voter i.d. loss disproportionately affect minorities -- implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain. as -- if white americans can get id to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left.
just government, and too much of it. here he is in a clip from the 2006 documentary "1%." >> in the end we'd end up worse off. it would do harm not good. people don't pay those high taxes, they find ways of getting around it. you're never going to be able to stop them from finding ways to get around it. jenna: talking a little bit about taxes there. my next guest has written extensively about milton freidman. we wanted to ask him, what would milton do, one of the greatest economists. nobel peace prize winning economist. we have the author of the inch dense pensable milton freidman. what would he think about all of this. >> great to be with you. i'm sure if milton freidman were here today, he'd say go over the fiscal cliff. jenna: straight over it? don't even press on the brakes. >> it's always worthwhile to meet and have negotiations. at the end ever the day he favored the least government spending possible. i believe he would have said that is a course that isn't going to be accomplished by raising taxes, rather by raising taxes that will provide funding for more government spending. f
government if it is not paid out? once you open up a claim, just because you have got to clean open, you have $4,000 in your account -- massachusetts, you might have $15,000 in your account. that money, if you do not dried out, the state keeps it, i believe. -- draw it out, the state keeps it, i believe. guest: i am not sure how that would be handled. the difference between what is happening in the state fund, which is state-funded, and the federal reimbursement, i believe the federal reimbursement only goes to the states after they pick up the money. guest: that is my understanding as well. i did nothing states are able to keep money that is not disbursed to the unemployment. -- do not think states are able to keep money that is not disbursed to the unemploymed. -- unemployed. host: for you, mr. tanner, who is better at running these programs, the state governments or federal governments? guest: states have very different economic climates. what is going on the dakotas right now, they're not even eligible for this emergency unemployment extended benefits, versus new york, which has the highe
the future of gay marriage throughout the entire united states. at issue is the federal government defense of marriage act that defines marriage as only the union between a man and woman and california's proposition 8 which banned gay marriage was overturned by an appeals court. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns has been following both cases for us. joe, explain the impact of today's decision. >> well, it is big impact. as you know, this is one of those cases that people talk about over the water cooler. let's start with proposition 8. very simple, wolf, it is the california ballot initiative passed in 2008 by the people of the state of california that established marriage as between a man and a woman. it overturned a court case that said same sex couples have the right to marry. windsor is the other case you were talking about, it is an attack on defense of marriage act which was passed in 1996 by the congress, signed by the president. it's called windsor against the united states. it is about a woman named edith windsor who had a long time relationship with her partner, and
yesterday on c- span2. if any family brand their house all the way the u.s. government ran there's, if we could not print money, we would be in a very bad way. i just think we need to get this deficit under control. those two wars that we have not paid for need to be paid for. you know, it has to be done. if going off the fiscal cliff means that it will be done, so be it. host: other groups are weighing in on these fiscal cliff talks. here is "the new york times" -- in the "financial times" this morning -- roger altman writing today in "the financial times." president obama will be meeting with several governors today at the white house to talk about the fiscal cliff. they will be meeting this morning around 10:00 a.m. eastern time, and then the governors are slated to hold a news conference at around 11:30 a.m. eastern time. go to our website for more details. washington insiders tackle fiscal cliff policy solutions. the group will hold a roundtable discussion today on the importance of reform to address the nation's debt and deficit spending this event takes place this morning around 8:
at something how much money we throw at it we'll august suggest more, more, more. >> government does such a good job tracking outcomes. >> let's track the outcomes of tax loopholes so if we're going to evaluate outcomes it's important to evaluate the outcomes of tax loopholes. >> how quickly will all this felt? say they have a deal three weeks into the new year, that doesn't help you if you're trying to run an agency budget because you've got to make plans for january 2nd. >> agencies were told to plan for the cuts, still don't think it should happen but we'll have plans in place in case they do. the omb and even federal agencies themselves can sort of postpone the impact of these cuts for at least a few weeks into the new year if we go over the cliff and if legislators are going to promise they are going to get a deal. so you may not feel these cuts at all. i should also say we don't know where the cuts are really going to come from because all we have are percentages per agentsy. it will affect a lot of things we talked about probably, but to the extent we can't say. >> this is som
to come together to the two branches of government to rebuild our differences for the betterment of all. one thing about every single member of congress that raise their hand and support the constitution of the united states, just going to in a very simplified way read the preamble which says it all if we are to remove the uncertainty that this great republic can and will govern itself and in that way held the world. we have to go back to this. we would form a more perfect union and a stylish justice and so forth, tranquility, provide for the defense. that's what we are talking about. providing for the common defense in a carefully measured way. and second, promote the general welfare. it's not just the welfare of the head of his or the have nots. it's the general welfare of all citizens of this country. and secure the blessings of liberty under the constitution. members ought to simply read that and say to themselves what can i do? while our press release says they should communicate with the people. but i would like to pose a challenge because here is some of it, and i thank each of y
it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're addressing some of these large issues here locally. particularly a recently announced demonstration of integrating care for coverage for the dual eligible. the dual eligible or individuals covered by medicare and medicaid. i don't know if you know this, but dual eligible operation represents 20% of the medicare population today and 31% of the cost. with excited to be part of this program under the strategic partnership with the company in dayton called care stories will be serving beneficiaries in cleveland and akron and youngstown. our partnership with care stories our ability and also appliquÉd conditions and their experiences being the leader in serving underprivileged people in health care for the last 23 years. it is this type of partnership designed to integrate care and simplify the health care experience
is going to be done down the road by the government. i don't know anyone who would ever believe such a promise. i don't expect that the republicans would accept that offer from the president. i just don't see that as ever happening in the city. let me ask you -- >> i'm sorry. republicans basically have to say our principles here are correct. our whole analysis of the economy is correct. we need massive spending decreases, and they've got to stick with that. if they can get decent spending increases and have to agree to additional revenue, fine. if they get pushed in the position the president is trying to push them, they stick with their principles, you know, and a year and a half from now go to the electorate with that. it worked in 10. it will probably work in 14. it will be a shame because it will do a lot of damage to our economy in between, but the president has that really on his shoulders. he's the leader. >> greta: mayor, thank you, sir. >> thank you. >> greta: breaking news out of syria. the syrian government mixing components for the deadly sarin nerve gas. the ranking
except trying to rein in government. >> the truth of the matter, what's a starting to happen is that international investors, the fact that we cannot govern is going to really come home to roost. >> gld man says this is the first time he's seen people take it out of american markets. >> it's he supposed to work this w way. they can't govern either. >> i was so hopeful, i wasn't obviously thrilled with the election results, but i actually thought that result might be the result we needed to get thefshs done. >> in a way you you have the situation where -- >> you extend 98 but not the 2? believing that story is so -- >> either raise them on everyone or raise them on -- either it will hurt the economy if you raise taxes or it's not. on 98 it won't hurt, on 2 it will -- >> we'll have more on this argument. in the meantime, let's talk about some of the other headlines. financial firms are gathering for the goldman sachs financial services contractors. a key presenter is brian money tha moynihan. we talked about his reports of planned fee increases. plus there was the issue of pres
. jennifer >>>> it's these "talking points" that the right have about "the heavy hand of government". i want to have that conversation. let's talk about it. really. really! that you're gonna lay people off because now the government's going to help you fund your health care. really? i wanna be able to have those conversations. not just to be confrontational, but to understand what the other side is saying. and you know, i'd like to arm our viewers with the ability to argue with their conservative uncle joe over the dinner table. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's "the stephanie miller show." ♪ i'm walkin' on sunshine ♪ ♪ i'm walkin' on sunshine ♪ ♪ and it's time to feel good ♪ ♪ hey, all right now ♪ ♪ and it's time to feel good ♪ >> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show." welcome to it! six minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-12. phone number toll free from anywhere. "the stephanie miller show" the web site. you can e-mail us all there. jim ward, chris lavoie, me, stephanie miller. very short to the point hate letter.
that when it's all said and done, the government could save $5.7 billion. but those 65 and 66-year-olds don't disappear. they are still going to be here and get sick sometimes which means the savings we'd see by kicking them off they pop back up elsewhere in the economy. it's not pure savings, it's a cost shift. you're going to see increased costs for seniors who will have to find another health insurer since it uses power to pay less by quite a bit. the seniors turning to private insurance will have to pay more from the same coverage. 3.7 billion more in the first year of the policy. for those who are eligible for medicaid, will move to the states, we think. then there are the employers. many of the ineligible will turn to their employers. that will increase the health care costs of companies by $5.4 billion. some of the seniors will turn to the affordable care act in the insurance exchanges. those left in medicare will pay a higher premium because the average premiums go up for those older and sicker. that will cost $2.5 billion. in order to save the federal government $5.7 billion this p
says liberalism as we define it is what you find in government and the federalist papers and john mill and tocqueville and all these, mostly guys i'm afraid, that's what liberalism is. then you can start constructing an idea that can compete with islamists. because islamism basically says we stand for just a. every islamist party is -- justice or freedom party, just as this, justice of that. how do you, how do you offer a competing level position in the arab world that can stand up against that? i don't think we are -- throw money at our have some program or some covert action. we need to approach the issue with some sense philosophically. the reality is there's racial we can do except protect against the interest we currently have in the region. weekend for the next 30 or 40 years think about how you create can't trace of general liberals who may someday run the country. i grew up in mexico. very briefly. mexico was a horrible backward authoritarian place with his loser presidents, and all of a sudden you get guys like fox and calderÓn, and where did they come from? they have a
to keep the government on track and keep the nation from going off the rails? we'll talk about that. plus, the push for marriage equality could get a huge lift from the high court. we'll examine what's next for those who want to see same-sex marriage become the law of the land. meanwhile, in egypt, they are just trying to get a functioning government off the ground. we'll go live to cairo where along with tear gas the words in the air today are martial law. >>> first, though, some developing news from south africa where nelson mandela is in the hospital right now. the former president is undergoing medical tests. that's according to the government. these tests have been planned for some time, we're told. they are consistent with his age. he is 94 years old. a family friend not saying how long mandela will be hospital iced, but a government spokesman insists there's, quote, no cause for alarm. mandela spent some time in the hospital earlier this year. he had stomach surgery. he became a bona fide world icon after spending some 27 years in prison for fighting against apartheid. in 1994, he
options will get the revenue for the government. >> in terms of getting rid of deductions or expanding the base, there's basically three approaches to we can take. one is the overall cap. capping the total amount of deductions or capping the tax value of deductions like maya and marty feld stein have put forth and the advantage to that is politically you're not actually attacking anyone -- any one specific subsidy, you're just saying we're putting a cap on the overall system. a second way is what john podesta mentioned, we are going to change specific items but wohl change them all in the same way. you're not special, we're not picking on you, so we're going to change all deductions to 18% or something like that. the third way which is probably the perfect way from the economic approach is to deal with each of these on an individual bay sess. tax expenditures generally cover an enormous range of activities whether it's ex-cluges or deductions or credits or lower rates, etc. we call them all tax expenditures but it shouldn't hide the underlying heterogeneity. so a package that went afte
taxes. that means the government expands without improving the one thing that works. so you are feeding obese fat man called the government who still isn't doing any good. what they are doing is blackmailing us. president obama is blackmailing saying if you don't do this, if you don't raise taxes on 2%, this is what will happen. >> eric: can i take issue with that? what if we don't go off the fiscal cliff? we are about sequestration later and do the game with the tax hike and spending cuts. we have the same thing? $20 trillion in the hole in four years, 25 trillion in nine years. nothing will change. this place is bankrupt. >> greg: president obama is obsessed with the 2%. like the crazy stalker breaking in david letterman's help. he hates the rich. it is not going to end. in two years we come back and deal with this. >> eric: why don't you want to go off the fiscal cliff? >> bob: a lot of people will get hurt. i don't care if the 2% will get hurt. >> greg: you hate rich people. >> bob: i don't hate them. they're all right. they give money to philharmonic. >> greg: without rich peopl pe
is taking its toll on maryland and virginia's governments. in maryland, state leaders say they can't make decisions on budget plans until they see how the fiscal cliff negotiations turn out. in virginia, governor bob mcdonnell says some of the cuts to state agencies recommended to him will appear in his budget even if congress and the white house reach a deal to avert the fiscal cliff. >>> a developing story out of north korea. the country may set off a long range rocket as early as this monday. that's according to media reports in south korea. the rocket is reportedly being fueled, but heavy snowfall may have slowed down preparations. north korea wants to launch what it calls a peaceful satellite sometimes before november 22nd. the u.s. believes the rocket is a cover to test missile technology. >>> president obama is speaking out against ongoing unrest in egypt. he has called egyptian president mohamed morsi to express concern about recent protests that have resulted in numerous deaths and injuries, calling the violence unacceptable. president obama did welcome morsi's call for talks wit
. >> there is no responsible way we can govern this country with those low rates in place for future generations. those rates are going to have to go up. >> house speaker john boehner appears to be struggling now that the president and democrats are negotiating for a position of power. talking points memo points out republicans are used to getting 70% to 75% of what they ask for in these types of negotiations but now speaker boehner is going on and on about how he's shocked and amazed at president's plan and is refusing to offer a counter plan on the republican side. you want to talk about this or anything else, join us online at current.com/stephaniemiller. we'll see you with more after the break. kind of guys who do like reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all of the time now. >> she gets the comedians laughing... >> that's hilarious! >> ...and the thinkers, thinking. >> okay, so there is wiggle-room in the ten commandments, is what you're telling me. >> she's joy behar. >> and the best part is that current will let me say anything. >> wh
and not serving what they swore to serve the american people. he points out the whole drowning the government in the bathtub. people are suggesting demolishing the government are anarchists. they are starving the beast by saying those who signed the pledge are unfit by office. [ applause ] >> stephanie: thank you, sir. >> it's like they are working for the confederacy or something. >> stephanie: yeah when you are saying that's my goal to drown the government in a bathtub. >> exactly. >> stephanie: thank you professor. [ applause ] >> you would do him. >> stephanie: no idea what he looks like. it doesn't matter. >> you would do him for his mind. >> turn the lights off. >> stephanie: just put the video on again, and put on this angelina jolie mask. [ buzzer ] >> you know she likes knives. >> stephanie: that's what makes it hot. >> well then. >> stephanie: here is what i love about the electoral pounding, is there is silver lining after silver lining isn't it? despite citizens united we were all so concerned, it turns out sheldon adleson lost $50 million more than was previously
will the federal government do? pot still illegal federally. today, a legal toke of revolution burning here and soon colorado. now, colorado's law, almost the exact same, will get going by january 5th. and the federal government has only said so far that they are reviewing both states' programs and they remind them that federally, at least, it is still illegal to possess marijuana. back to you. >> miguel marquez for us this morning, thanks, miguel. let's get right to alan st. pierre, he's in washington, d.c., the executive director for the group fighting for the legalization of marijuana since they were founded back in 1972. nice to have you with us. you heard miguel's report. there are strict rules, it's going to be heavily taxed, still considered to be illegal by the feds. what's your reaction to what happened at the stroke of midnight? >> well, that's a celebration to be sure. that's pent-up 75 years of marijuana prohibition in america, even though the law technically doesn't allow for public use. let's acknowledge it was just a public celebration. >> so if you think that this is the end
going on right now? >> the local government right now is on its search and retrieval operation. however, there are just some areas which are very difficult to reach because at this time, the roads are destroyed. however, the local government is speeding up their search and rescue and retrieval operations in this area, and also, one mission with the local government and other partners with the area can provide for the survivors. >> you are part of a response team. and we know that in crises like this, it's the responders who have personal challenges of their own. how are the responders reacting to this and coping with it all? >> yeah, actually, working in the humanitarian aid or working emergency response is really a tough job. it's really difficult to see the people's faces where they are very emotion al. there were those who were crying. you know, what makes me feel right now is to do whatever i can do, do the best i can do in order to serve the people, to be able to help with the people who are in need. that's the best thing that you can see them somehow, when world vision came into t
main categories they have -- one is how to reduce the size of government, and the other half of it is this model legislation that's in the corporate good. in other words, there's a profit-driven legislation. how can you open up a new market? how can you privatize something that can open up a market for a company? and between those two divisions, you are kind of getting to the same end goal, which is really kind of ultimate privatization of everything. >> mark pocan is something of an expert on alec. in fact, to learn as much as he could, he became a member. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> what i realized is if you join alec for a mere $100 as a legislator, you have the full access like any corporate member. >> he also took himself to an alec conference for a first-hand look. >> hi, i'm state representative mark pocan, and welcome to my videoblog. i'm outside the marriott on canal street in new orleans at the alec convention, the american legislative exchange council. that was where you watch the interaction of a room full of lobbyists -- free drinks, free cigars, wining, dining. many people j
perceived to be democratic because they rely on the government. >> both parties tend to divide america into our voters and their voters. republicans must steer clear of that trap. we need to speak to the aspirations -- we must speak to the aspirations and anxieties of every american. i believe we can turn on the engines of upper mobility so that no one is left out from the promise of america. >> reporter: senator rubio said he thinks the promise of tomorrow is with hotel workers, landscapers and late-night january towards. senator rubio says he doesn't thing lower-income americans are looking for handouts. he thinks they are looking for jobs so they can provide for their families. >> government has a role to play and we should be sure it does its part. but it's a supporting role to help create the conditions to create prosperity. it can't substitute for a thriving free economy. >> reporter: senator rubio says the federal government could do more equipping the americans with skills for 21st century middle class jobs. martha: in california, one of the nation's largest teacher's unions is
into the possibility that there could be more victims. >>> david letterman doesn't do stupid government tricks but here's one that might qualify if he did. spend $8 million to repair some county streets, then two months later, dig one of them up for utility work. residents of silver spring brisbane street are fighting to keep that from happening. tonight they've at least gotten a delay on the plan. gary niewrn berg is back from talks with some is very frustrated neighbors. >> reporter: anita, they spent years waiting to get their pothole-filled street repaired and are now incredulous at the prospect of digging it up again only two months after the project was finally completed. looks pretty good now. very nice and smooth as a baby's bottom. but before brisbane was repaved -- >> i had to have my car realigned twice over the last two years because of all the potholes. >> we had a hole down there 18 inches deep. >> reporter: so they love the improved street. happy neighbors. >> really perfect state of pavement. >> reporter: now the freshly paved street has something fresher estimate marks from a utility c
's the case. in fairfax county, they could be particularly vulnerable. big cutbacks in government spending could mean big trouble for information technology and defense-related contracting firms that carry a lot of federal business. if spending on those firms gets cut, a lot of people could be out of a job. >> if you go make the kind of cuts that some are suggesting happen, then you're really hurting a lot of the small businesses and residents in fairfax county who rely on federal contracts for their livelihood. ultimately that trickles down to and affects fairfax county. >> fairfax county alone took in $23 billion in federal contracting money back in 2009. that's more than any other county in the country. and it's $3 billion more than washington, d.c. growth for contracting in fairfax county has been explosive to back in 1980 federal contracting dollars totaled just $1.7 billion. why is nova been such a big draw for federal contracting dollars and the big salary jobs that come with them? one word for you. dulles. the international airport provides easy access to washington on its limited
on first street northwest. and we're told that he worked as a federal government employee for the u.s. agency for international development. still there is no word yet what caused the fire. >>> d.c.'s chapter of the guardian angels patrolled the block of southeast to help students stay safe going to school. they were on morris road where an 18-year-old girl was robbed and shot in the leg on tuesday morning on the way to class. the guardian angels will be on morning patrol the rest of the week here. >>> former d.c. couple chairman kwame brown's brother is facing bank fraud charges. chay brown was charged today and his attorney said he plans to plead guilty. he claimed $35,000 in income he never made on a mortgage loan modification q. brown previously was convicted for bank fraud and he was found guilty 20 years ago in a separate case. >>> the prince georges county judge said that governor o'malley does not have to appoint a nominee to fill an empty delegate seat. greg hall was nominated by democratic committee in the county to fill tiffany alston's seat. she left office when she was
those it doesn't come from the government. it's from wealthy people who are philanthropist who give of their time and money to fund programs for the kids. won't be able to get a job in ten years because they won't graduate. >> bob: all? >> dana: a significant portion. if it doesn't come from government where does it come? >> bob: not from rich people. >> dana: it does. >> eric: hang on. most importantly, ed asner? >> kimberly: i was in a movie happily ever after. judge and i are a defense attorney. he's the uncle of my ex-husband. >> bob: which? >> kimberly: gavin. >> dana: can you sing a song from that? >> greg: this is about it was a truther working with your teachers. that is the freakty thing. they know history and they're working with the truther. we have kids working with the wackos. anti-capitalist filmmaker michael moore member of the 1% believes in taking from the rich and giving to the poor. you know what else he believes? lining his pocket with the taxpayer dollars. that story is ahead on "the five." ♪ ♪ >> eric: welcome back. i'm often asked if liberals really believ
and he stayed involved working for the american government. those three were very seriously injured early in their time in north africa, which is in a way why they survived. >> rachel cox, this is your book, "into dust and fire: five young americans who went first to fight the nazis." we didn't want to give voice to much of the indian. we gave away a little of it. rachel cox has another uncle who became rather notorious, and that is who? >> archibald cox to everyone in my family called him uncle bill. nobody knows why. that was his nickname. maybe just didn't like being called archie, i don't know spent so you called him uncle bill? >> yes. >> he is well-connected to the watergate era. what do you remember about that era? >> well, i think the general feeling was that it was characteristic of him to resign when his put in a position. i guess he was fired actually. he didn't resign, but anyway, he left. he wouldn't be with the president told him to do what he felt it to be illegal and against his convictions. and he left. so it kind of fits with what uncle robbie did. they're a family who
should not be conceding that the federal government needs more money, negotiating with ourselves and treating the president's proposal like it's serious. >> we do agree that 8% of the american people are getting about 80% of this tax cut shouldn't have their taxes raised. my suggestion was let's take the one area we agree and take it off the table. >> but zoraida, as you saw there from the president earlier in that bloomberg interview, he is digging in, saying there can't be a deal unless upper income americans pay more. middle-class americans should get the bush era tax cut extension. is he not backing down from that at all. the president saying in that interview that he's not being stubborn. he's not being partisan but rather that it's, quote, a matter of math. >> we've been talking now for a while that americans blame republicans if a deal doesn't go through. new polling shows americans are pessimistic a deal will be reached at all. break down those numbers for us. >> the tune that we're seeing now from not only the white house but also members up on capitol hill where they on
in governing his own republican conference. there's a hardcore group of people that in his conference that came here to tear down. they have never adapted to having to govern. it's extraordinarily difficult to get a majority of his conference to go along with anything. the speaker has to jettison the rule, the majority of the majority rule where he won't take up anything without a majority of the republican conference. he can get something strongly bipartisan, but it may mean having to take on that conservative clique in his conference and say, look, we have responsibility to govern. we have responsibility to do the right thing, and the american people are counting on us and we have to acknowledge the argument we made against any kind of tax increase on upper income families, we've lost that fight and argument. it's time to come together and compromise. >> let me play what senator ron johnson said on cnn just this morning regarding the president and what he says the president is not understanding here. let's play it. >> this president just simply doesn't understand that, and so as a result he p
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